All posts by Cuts for him

Men's lifestyle blog to include Fashion and Style, Fitness, Art and Culture, Travel and Grooming

The Scent to match my Sartorial style

I am sure you would have heard the saying “you are never fully dressed without perfume!” by C. JoyBell C. If indeed this is the first of hearing it then you can thank me later. A very apt saying I would say. That’s why I instantly fell in love with Sartorial by Penhaligon’s London, the perfume that can actually match my looks and style.

I want you to imagine bespoke tailoring, Savile row, leather, and some lavender and tell me what you come up with, in your mind. Found anything yet? Well, fret no more as I present to you the fragrance that was specifically made to match the dapper look for men.

Sartorial is an unapologetic and bold fragrance that contains headnotes such as Ozonic Effect, Metallic Effect, Violet Leaf, Neroli, Cardamom, Black Pepper, Fresh Ginger. Its heart notes are Beeswax, Cyclamen, Linden Blossom, Lavender, Leather, and base note Gurgum Wood, Myrrh, Cedarwood, Tonka Bean, Oakmoss, Honey Effect, Old Wood Effect.

Does this sound complex to you? Well, it probably is if you are someone who is used to simple fresh notes in perfumes. It’s a masculine fragrance for the modern man who wants to be noticed for all the right reasons when he enters a room and wants to be remembered after they have left. Sartorial by Penhaligon’s London is perfume as an evening fragrance.

Sartorial by Penhaligon’s London

Love your skin, love Elemis | Cuts for Him review

Coming off the back of my last grooming post, I feel like I am on a roll here. However, I must admit to bringing you this article way later than anticipated.

So back in early October, I had the privilege of being treated to a facial at Elemis’s in-store exchange at John Lewis, Oxford street. Honestly, I have never been so excited about my skin after I got the treatment in a very long time. Within a matter of minutes, I saw my skin being transformed completely. Ok if I sound as if I am completely sold on this product. Having said all that, you must be wondering why it took me this long to Continue reading Love your skin, love Elemis | Cuts for Him review

Edmond, Adesuwa, and Dior. Inspiration from Africa

Happy Sunday everyone. Trust you are all well and 2020 is off to a good start.
So if you have been checking out my insta stories in the past 48 hours then you would have noticed a debate happening that involves African fashion, Dior, and Adesuwa. After a healthy exchange via DM, Adesuwa and I thought it would be great to open up this convo to everyone. A healthy debate is would be great.
Allow me to summarise:
1. I made a few stories encouraging designers from Africa to step up their game as the world is looking at the continent for inspiration, citing Dior’s 2020 Cruise collection as an example.
2. I also encouraged consumers to support African craftsmanship by purchasing goods esp emerging talents.
3. This led to me citing Dior’s prices as high compared to local artisans, tailors, and designers in Africa. Dior’s prices are completely justifiable as they are a luxury brand.
4. I then dug up the old Dior Cruise 2020 collection video Narrated by Adesuwa where creative director Maria categorically denies the collection was not African inspired. See video here
5. Adesuwa went on to imply that now that Dior is in Africa, the continent wouldn’t be “this mystical place that no one knows about”. I strongly objected to this statement and others like it in the video.
To be clear
I welcome
  • The fact that Dior worked with artisans in Africa
  • Inspired by African patterns and Silhouettes and craftsmanship
  • In fact, I welcome and celebrate everything Dior did creatively with this collection. I also do not have a problem with the price tag as it’s in keeping with Dior.
I Object to
  • Dior’s Creative Director not referencing African inspiration. Outrightly denying it’s not African
  • Adesuwa implying that Africa is a mystical place that no one knows about before Dior came in.
A gentle suggestion was for Dior to have highlighted the stories of the artisans they worked with to create a clearer picture of the origins of the collection.
As you can see from the screenshots and videos, I truly encourage a healthy debate/discussion on this topic.

What do you guys think? Does Dior have anything to answer for? Could Adesuwa have worded her description better?

Thoughts below

From peasant to stylish hat & everything in-between, a Beret’s journey | Cuts for Him

What we know today as the Beret was called felt hat hundreds of years ago. Yes, the Beret has been around that long. In fact, according to fashion historians, the Beret has been around for millennia.

This disc-like shaped headgear made of wool and worn by anyone wanting to look like an artist, a revolutionary or simply wanting to keep warm, looked nothing like its original form. It is said that the beret (then called felt) is a crossbreed between the floppy Petasos hat and the cone-shaped Pileos hat. Yeah, that’s right, I had to google both these hats to see how they looked like. Judging from their shapes, I wouldn’t argue against fashion historians. At the time, this headgear was made from felt as it was simple and cheap material to use.

The 14th and 15th centuries saw the hat been worn in Europe by farmers and artists alike. At the time, the felt was very Continue reading From peasant to stylish hat & everything in-between, a Beret’s journey | Cuts for Him