Tag Archives: Fashion

Louis Vuitton Series 3 London Exhibition

The Petite Malle

Louis Vuitton, the brand name that makes women scream with excitement and as for men, let’s not even go there.

I have never understood why people are so label conscious especially with it comes to brands like LV. Could it be for the quality of the product, the brand name, clever advertising or is it a mash up of all the above?

A friend of a friend told me about the LV series 3 exhibition over the weekend and decided to check it out. Armed with my canon camera on Monday, I walked into 180 strand where the exhibition was held with high hopes of taking snaps of baddass men’s shoes, retro looking leather jackets and some nice overnight bags. Yep I love overnight bags as they serve me very well especially when I take quick trips into Europe.

Master Mind: The trunks in the distance contains Nicolas Chesquiere’s creative processes and inspiration.

Anyway, I walked into the building to be greeted by friendly staff as I quickly made my way to the first room of the exhibition. Mind you, I had not researched this exhibition so I did not know what to expect apart from seeing nice designer pieces of garments of some sorts. And because I did not book a guided tour, I had to figure out things as I go along. Snap snap snap as I walked casually from one room to another trying to get to the men’s wear exhibits. Room after room was filled with women’s garment and nothing for men, apart from the trunks which anyone can use.

Feeling disappointed as I walk into the “walk in wardrobe” section, I decided to have a quick glance at the photos I have taken so far. Nothing worth my while I said to myself. Where are the men’s stuff?

However, it was at this point that I had a eureka moment. You know that feeling you get when that aha moment hits you. So here I was sulking (sort of) over men’s wear not being available rather than just enjoying the elegance, craftsmanship and timeless pieces in front me.

Master Mind room with two trunks hanging from the ceiling

With a change of attitude, I walked back into the last room only this time I saw the exhibits differently. As I made my way through the rooms I had already visited, I started to notice things I did not see before. I began to appreciate the beauty and style that embodied one of the most recognisable brands in modern history. The timeless trunks, the elegant details on the dresses, the studded shoes and handbags all came alive. Even my photos got better all thanks to a change of attitude and perspective.

One of the Artisans at work meticulously piecing together a Petite Malle.

One of the pieces that caught my attention and fascination was the Petite Malle. This small but beautiful handbag is crafted in the Louis Vuitton tradition of high style. The Petite Malle is a fusion of canvas and classic hardware inspired by the original Maison trunks.

I really got fascinated as I watched one of the artisans (specially flown in from France for the exhibition) as she carefully pieced one of the Malles together. The precession and attention to detail is unparalleled. From our brief conversation, I learnt that one Petite Malle takes up to 30 hours to assemble with 9 stages from start to finish. Now I can see why LV is so sought after by many.

Petite Malle

“Series 3 is a stand-alone exhibition showcasing a designer and his creative process and influences. Far more than a simple collection, it is a stream of consciousness, dreams and self-reflective journeys. Inside a designers mind, muses intertwine with cherished memories and visions of new shapes, cuts and meticulous craftsmanship. He sits between the past he embraced the future”. LV Series 3 exhibition

The science of Savoir-Faire: The laser cutting room

So yeah I enjoyed the exhibition and if you are in or around London between now and the 18th of October 2015, I strongly recommend popping in for a visit. Well worth it.

Shorts: the Long and short of it

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You know what, I think my short wearing game is getting better (even if I have to say so myself) with every passing summer since forever. And I am not talking about wearing shorts just to pop round to the corner shop neither and I will explain if you give me a minute.

To some, the idea of wearing shorts automatically conjures scenes of strolling along the seaside on a hot holiday with a beer in hand. If I am honest, I know people who do not even contemplate the notion of wear shorts at all beyond their front door. Some may even see shorts as a less worthy investment due to their seasonal nature or their alleged lack of versatility. It’s like saying it’s a pair of shorts and that’s that. To many, the thought of looking like a schoolboy is a massive turn off and to be honest, you will look like a school boy if you do not know how to dress shorts, which is kind of why I have put together this article.

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So before you go all snobbish over a pair of shorts for fear of making you look like a schoolboy, hear me out whiles I remind you that shorts have been and are still part of an array of official uniforms for different professions such as the military and police for practical and functional purposes. And we all know that police and army are as professional as it gets when it comes to uniforms. Police officers in many British colonies (especially those in hot regions) in the 50s wore Khaki shorts as part of their uniforms and two such examples were Hong Kong and Sierra Leone. Even now, there are parts of the world where shorts are worn by police officers on beach and bike patrol.

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In fashion, apart from Pharrel Williams who wore shorts with a bow tie to the Oscars in 2014, other notable men who dress up and make short wearing effortlessly cool are Sam Lambert (half of art comes first), and Nick Wooster.

What I am trying to explain above is that shorts can be used outside of sports and recreational purposes for grown men. Did I hit a cord with you? Is that a yes or a nah?

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Anyway now that we have established that shorts are not just for school boys and strolling along the beach, let’s see how we can put this look together.

I have used shorts in various capacities but for best results here is what you need to do to push the envelope and stand out.

Pair your shorts with a nice dress shirt, dress belt, pair of loafers (preferable penny loafers), and depending on the occasion and weather, a blazer. As you can see in some of the images, I have used a tie and a bow tie for some added integrity.

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Just before you go out and splurge on all kinds of short, here are a few things to consider:

Stick with chinos or Khakis
Avoid baggy
Avoid patterns and stick with solid colours
Runaway from cargo shorts and stick with classic cut

Not only is this a cool look which will set you apart from the crowd, it is the most practical way of dressing for hot weather whiles still maintaining looking dapper. Did I hear you say this look is what casual Fridays at work are made for right? Errmmm I will let you go through the painstaking task of reading you HR manual.

Oh and when you decide to don you spanking new pair of shorts trying to look all fly, please do yourself a favour and moisturise your legs.

 

Summer essential: The ethical t-shirt by Run and Fell

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T-shirts! What’s there to say about t-shirts that has not already been said? It’s a t-shirt, it’s a t-shirt, and a t-shirt! Those were my exact thoughts when I got the invitation to the launch of Run and Fell a t-shirt brand opening a pop-up store in Chelsea, London.

I was convinced there was nothing new for me to learn and write about when it comes to t-shirts. In fact the Style and fashion aspect to my blog is focused on the dapper and dandy look which has no place for t-shirts. Well at least that was what I thought before I read the entire invitation which went on to state the uniqueness of this brand. Simply put, I was wrong.

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The unique concept behind the pop-up store involves directly connecting the customer with the manufacturing process. Customers are becoming increasingly aware and discerning when it comes to the ethics of the Fashion industry. The “big idea” for the RUN&FELL pop-up is to promote ethical garment production, and to enable customers to engage with and explore elements of the production process first hand” said Naomi Jackson (designer and owner of Run and Fell) in her email to me. I don’t know about you but this got my attention. Run and Fell seem to have stepped away from the usual manic consumerism everyone is used to where items of clothing are churn out with little or no regard for the process or the material used to create them. I mean we have all heard of the chaotic and sometimes dangerous conditions (branded sweatshop) in which many items of clothing were made from around the world. Run and Fell’s ethos couldn’t have been further away from this. Phew, what a breath of fresh air. I mean don’t get me wrong, I am sure you would have heard of other brands promoting the ethical side of their business but for a brand to actually be so keen as to draw their customers into the intricate process of how the garment is produced is commendable. To me, this demonstrates care and pride in the product.

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Another aspect of Run and Fell that really spoke to me is the fact that the brand is proudly and unapologetically British. Many brands have in the past spent millions on repackaging their products as foreign before going back to the country of origin to give them a luxurious or exotic feel. Run and Fell does not only fly the British flag, it also proudly incorporate the local spirit and history of Manchester  “our roots are threaded deep into the creative heart of the cotton city, “Cottonopolis” itself” as stated in their story.

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Speaking to Naomi during the evening of the Launch, it was obvious that Run and Fell is not just another brand aiming to make a few quid from the sale of a few t-shirt but was committed to creating a piece of garment she truly believed in. The passion and standards she spoke with was in line with the physical product I had in my hand. The texture was one of quality whiles the designs channelled originality and creativity.

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Run and Fell is a great example of a sustainable ethical garment brand with an attitude of substance and integrity over everything else.

Listen, its summer and everyone needs a t-shirt so head over to Run and Fell’s online store and make yourself a purchase you will be happy with.

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Traditional wedding – The Yoruba way

 

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As summer ushers in the peak wedding season for UK residents, its fitting for me to share some images of an amazing wedding I attended a few months ago between friends of mine Abi and Sam. This was not just any other wedding but a traditional Nigerian wedding.

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Anyone who has ever been to a Nigerian wedding will tell you that they are colourful, lengthy, entertaining, vibrant and big. I mean there is no dull moment in a Nigerian wedding and Abi and Sam’s wedding was no exception. Armed with the knowledge that food and Afrobeat music was going to be in plentiful supply, I was determined to have an amazing time. After all, this would be my first experience of a traditional Nigerian or more appropriately, a Yoruba wedding.

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Traditional African weddings are as old as humanity itself. In fact they are only referred to as such to differentiate them from western style weddings more commonly known as “white weddings”. The term white wedding has its roots from the Victorian era when Queen Victoria wore a white lace to marry Prince Albert in 1840. I don’t know why Queen Victoria thought it necessary to break the norm of wearing coloured garments but this has somehow become the de facto dress code for brides, with the entire ceremony now referred to as white wedding. I guess she has earned herself the title of trendsetter when it comes to wedding dresses.

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Fast-forward to current day, a lot of couples choose to do both white and Traditional African weddings to cater for the Christian religious aspect and to bring in line their traditional identity as is customary in most tribes in Africa. Even though some might argue that traditional weddings are only an engagement ceremony and a prelude to white wedding, I happen to think that they have all the pedigree to make them full weddings depending on how the ceremony is carried out. Anyway, I am not a wedding expert so I will leave that for you to decide.

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What Abi and Sam wore was absolutely beautiful. Not only are the colours vibrant and beautiful, the style encapsulate the tradition of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Their garments are both made from a special cloth called Asa oke fabric hand loomed in western Nigeria. Asa oke means top cloth in English.

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What they wore

Abi:

Iro – a red with gold floral wrap skirt
Buba – a gold blouse
Gele – a red with gold floral head tie
Earring – Red and gold earring with matching necklace.
Shoes – Christian Louboutin

Sam

Agbada – Red and gold outer wear
Trouser – Cream linen
Shirt – Cream linen
Hat – Red and gold made from Aso oke
Shoes – Jimmy Choo

I am sure you will agree with me that this wonderful couple knows how to mix traditional attire with high end fashion to create a beautiful whole.

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This was truly an amazing ceremony I was honoured to be a part of and if you are not familiar with the Yoruba tradition and custom of marriage, I hope you have learnt something new. If you are Yoruba or familiar to the tradition, feel free to leave a comment below if there is anything you would like to add. Enjoy the rest of the photos.

Congratulations Abi and Sam!